Africa’s World Cup

THE NEW SCHOOL, 66 WEST 12TH STREET.  Room 510

Date: May 4, 2010

Time: 3-5 pm

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

The 2010 World Cup is historic: it will be the first time the tournament will be hosted on the African continent.

When FIFA, the world soccer governing body, awarded the World Cup to South Africa in May 2004, Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s first democratic president spoke for a lot of his compatriots and millions on the continent when he exclaimed: “I feel like a 15 year old.”

Africa has historically been shunned by world football—viewed mainly as a cheap source of talent for Europe’s football leagues. Expectations are therefore high for what will be Africa’s first World Cup tournament.

So are debates, not just about the football, but also about its wider significance: whether about development, nation building, identity, expression, politics, history, media images, or consumption.  A panel of experts–journalists, writers and academics–will set light on these issues.

Sean Jacobs, GPIA assistant professor, in conversation with Time Magazine senior editor Tony Karon, Austin Merrill, who writes the Fair Play blog for Vanity Fair, and writers Binyavanga Wainaina and Teju Cole.

They’re all fans of the beautiful game.

The discussion will be complemented by film and video clips.

Further Reading

A private city

Eko Atlantic in Lagos, like Tatu City in Nairobi, Kenya; Hope City in Accra, Ghana; and Cité le Fleuve in Kinshasa, DRC, point to the rise of private cities. What does it mean for the rest of us?

What she wore

The exhibition, ‘Men Lebsa Neber,’ features a staggering collection of the clothes and stories of rape survivors across Ethiopia.