Since African women need to be saved by Nicholas Kristof, I’m not surprised to find that only two of them made Forbes’s America-centric (surprise, surprise) list of “The 100 Most Official Women: The top United Nations human rights official, Navanethem Pillay (she’s South African) and the President of Liberia, Ellen Sirleaf-Johnson (BTW, I think Sirleaf-Johnson is probably the most media-savvy African President) .

Is Pillay the most powerful African woman?

The top five women on the lists are: German Chancellor Angela Merkel, top US government finance official Sheila Bair, Pepsico Chief Executive Indra Nooyi, Anglo American chief executive Cynthia Carroll and Ho Ching, the chief executive of Singapore’s flagship sovereign wealth fund.

(By the way, you know what I think about the uselessness of these kinds of lists.)

For the fill list, go here.

Further Reading

Exile, Return, Home?

Many will read Sisonke Msimang’s new memoir for its musings on exile and home, but it is also a political telling of the complicated South African transition.