9 minutes read

News from Nigeria

I told my son that he would get his first sense of things as soon as we boarded the flight. Planes bound for Lagos, I told him, were filled with…..

2 minutes read

Ghanaian preachers say the darndest things

Ghanaian preachers are attracting international press for peculiar reasons. It is not uncommon the world over for religious figures to wade in on political issues and find themselves considered as a respected authority on a given matter. The former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, often gave his opinion on social and political affairs and Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s disdain for the current incarnation of South Africa’s ruling ANC party is well known. Ghanaian preachers are no different. And now, after years of finding (read advertising) themselves in the pages of national newspapers they too have reached the global stage. Albeit for less noble reasons.

7 minutes read

Africa has always been more Queer than generally acknowledged

Homosexuality is also often depicted as an import from the deviant West. But the African Continent has always been more queer than generally acknowledged; it has always rainbow-hazed into such a range of sexualities that it is a matter of legitimate political and critical concern that homosexualities and African societies are read as antinomous. Also, these homosexualities fall outside of the purview of the law and even of language. The expression—‘to call a spade a spade’— entails speaking plainly without avoiding embarrassing issues. But what if the spade, while remaining a tool, is called differently in another language? While same-sex practices are rampant throughout the African Continent, claiming homosexual identity is forbidden and even condemned. The question of what constitutes ‘sex’ in Africa and, in particular, same-sex sex is still a blindspot.

2 minutes read

The other news from Uganda this week

Here’s the `other’ news from Uganda this week. Dateline: Kampala: “Police have warned the public against undressing women whom they perceive to be indecently dressed, saying the Anti-Pornography law is not operational yet.” Yet.

4 minutes read

A Visitor’s Guide to India

Last weekend in Khirki Village, Delhi, a late-night mob led by the Aam Admi Party (AAP) leader and Delhi Law Minister Somnath Bharti went looking for “some Nigerians or Ugandans.” They pulled four young African women out of their home, held them captive in a taxi for hours, probed their “private parts”, forced them to urinate publicly, hustled them to a hospital against their will for “tests”, and reluctantly let them go the next morning. In the light of this event, and given black peoples’ fondness for suspicious activities like studying, working, breathing, etc., many foreigners wish to know if India is worth visiting. This is an inclusive website, so here is a handy guide for potential travellers of all races.

5 minutes read

The #BullshitFiles: An Open Letter to the New Yorker

Following the publication of Elizabeth Rubin’s profile of Shannon Sedgwick Davis (“How a Texas Philanthropist Helped Fund the Hunt for Joseph Kony”, posted October 21, 2013), readers have raised concerns about the New Yorker’s fact-checking process, as well as its apparent lack of interest in the legal and ethical implications of funding private military operations with secretly managed funds.

7 minutes read

Homophobia from Kansas to Kampala

A few years ago, the documentary film Darwin’s Nightmare, told the chilling story of the social and environmental destruction wrought in Central Africa as cargo planes from Europe delivered load…..

5 minutes read

Israel’s Uganda Plan

Last month we blogged about the revelation that a number of African countries (dubbed “third countries”) are on the verge of signing an agreement with Israel to absorb African asylum…..

5 minutes read

We need to talk about Jeremy Clarkson

In the spirit of recent posts on AIAC about reality TV shows in Germany and Italy which use Africa as background to national television’s asinine imagination, I’d like to step back a few months and check out one of England’s own televised fits of historical delusion.