2802
6 mins read

The Historic Legacy of Ivor Wilks

I first met Ivor Wilks in 1976, when I appeared in his office doorway – a befuddled, nervous, and apprehensive undergraduate – with a rather vague and naïve idea about…..

3738
11 mins read

A museum in the middle of the street

Three towering moko jumbies stroll up behind the stage, as if on cue, dressed in suits of glow-in-the-dark yellow and electric blue. The sun is setting on the second and…..

3545
Less than a minute read

‘This Ewe Boy’

New video for ‘Hope,’ by Ghanaian rapper Abladzo Kwame, off his EP ‘This Ewe Boy.’

2043
9 mins read

Photoscapes in Accra: Ofoe Amegavie Speaks

As photography in Ghana continues to gain recognition, Ofoe Amegavie is definitely one to watch. At 26 years old, Ofoe’s work has quickly gained an international audience with folks across…..

3848
3 mins read

A Bronx Story: Ghana vs USA

The fate of World Cup draws has fostered an unlikely rivalry between Ghana and the United States. In 2006, Ghana dispatched the U.S. in Germany. Four years later, in South…..

7108
8 mins read

When Maya Angelou lived in Egypt and Ghana

In 1961, Maya Angelou, already a civil rights worker, and her then partner Vusumzi Make, an exiled activist from South Africa (he was a leading Pan Africanist Congress member), moved…..

9559
2 mins read

“An African City,” the web series about five single women in Accra, Ghana

For the last few weeks social media has been abuzz with comments about a new web series set in Accra called An African City. The series tells the story of the ‘Afropolitan Returnee’ and as one viewer aptly put it: it is “Sex and the City meets Americanah where she [the book’s protagonist] goes back to Lagos.” Though not as finely tuned.

3235
2 mins read

Ghanaian preachers say the darndest things

Ghanaian preachers are attracting international press for peculiar reasons. It is not uncommon the world over for religious figures to wade in on political issues and find themselves considered as a respected authority on a given matter. The former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, often gave his opinion on social and political affairs and Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s disdain for the current incarnation of South Africa’s ruling ANC party is well known. Ghanaian preachers are no different. And now, after years of finding (read advertising) themselves in the pages of national newspapers they too have reached the global stage. Albeit for less noble reasons.