Now Soulja Boy takes on Joseph Kony

It has come to this. Musicians, especially rappers, had to wade in. Like everyone else who is now an expert on Uganda, rappers were quick to declare themselves on board with #Kony2012. (African musicians who were quick to uncritically post (their approval of) #Kony2012 were electro rapper and and a favorite of this site, Spoek Mathambo (who has since deleted his support), The Very Best (same like Spoek), and other South Africans like Gazelle and Van Coke Cartel, who still support #Kony2012.)

But some have taken it further, setting their admiration to music. They had to release songs (isn’t it too early?). You can imagine the deep thoughts that took a whole 72 hours (at best) to be formulated. It’s like a hot take. I woke up this morning to learn that Soulja Boy, who likes a fight (his last adversary was 80s rapper and now actor, Ice T), has thrown in his lot with Invisible Children and wants to “Stop Kony” (H/T: Palika Makam).

If you want to be tortured, go listen here.

Hilarious and embarrassing. This is not even a song. It’s like a monologue set to some vague drum beat. And he drops the word “swag” a few times.

Even more perplexing: why any other musician would want to rap to such dead lyrics or music. But Soulja Boy’s music has been used in the past by other musicians (yes, clearly not by him) to comment on war (that time, it was on child soldiers in Sierra Leone).

As I blogged at the time, in January 2010:

I don’t have much time for the phenomenon that is Soulja Boy and his nonsensical lyrics. Like in “Turn My Swag On.” But a German group, Die Orsons, took the song, slowed it down, gave it a acoustic feel, worked in some images from a short film, some CNN audio, an interview with former child soldier Ismael Beah, and made it into a protest/PR for a campaign about stopping child soldiers.

 

But back to the present.

Another rapper, Mistah F.A.B., has also made a Joseph Kony song (“Kony Freestyle”). He has better beats than Soulja, and at least his rhymes go with the music, and he combines it with some geopolitics  (“it’s all a Government ploy to get oil out of Uganda”) and, sadly, some epithets.

Listen here.

Sean Jacobs

Sean Jacobs is the Founder and Editor of Africa is a Country. He is on faculty of The New School in New York.

7 Comments

Comments are closed