Not sure if this more about Seun Kuti‘s desire to sell more units of his latest album out on Monday (he has been talking a lot the last few days), but he has a way with words:

I’d been following events in Tunisia for months. In Libya, people are fighting for freedom from Gaddafi – but with Western influence. And Britain is Gaddafi’s biggest arms supplier; he has houses all  over Europe … You want to help African people – why don’t you stop African rulers from stashing their wealth in your countries?… I think a better way for the British and US governments is to load their planes full of my albums and drop them on Libya.

Source

For a debate on the hard issues, see here.

Further Reading

Detritus of revolution

Nthikeng Mohlele’s novel Small Things (2013) provides a rejoinder to J. M. Coetzee’s Disgrace (1999), depicting a black man’s perspective on the failures of South Africa’s transition.

At the edge of sight

Ambivalent: Photography and Visibility in African History is one of very few books to have come out of the continent about photography where the majority of contributors are African scholars.

Music is the weapon

During Christmas 1980, Hugh Masekela and Miriam Makeba performed at a concert in Lesotho that deeply challenged and disturbed South Africa’s apartheid regime. The record of that concert is being reissued.

Carceral colonialism

On the United Kingdom’s attempts to finance the construction of large-scale prison facilities in former colonies, to where it wants to deport undocumented migrants.

Fanon’s mission

The works of Frantz Fanon can be read as architectural renderings of rights, futures, and generations toward a “very different Afro-futurism.”

History time

The historical novel is in vogue across the continent, challenging how we conceive of the nation, and how we write its histories.