AFRICA IS A COUNTRY

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Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

The other news from Uganda this week

Here’s the `other’ news from Uganda this week. Dateline: Kampala: “Police have warned the public against undressing women whom they perceive to be indecently dressed, saying the Anti-Pornography law is not operational yet.” Yet.

Saturday, February 15th, 2014

What it is to be Winnie Mandela

I just finished reading a fascinating appetizer to John Carlin’s new book on Nelson Mandela, Knowing Mandela, and it set me wondering what might be the place of solitude in the narration of South African history. Some of...

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

The enduring controversy around Egyptian-American activist Mona Eltahawy

A week ago the Huffington Post published an article written by Melissa Jeltsen on an increasingly familiar name in women’s activism in the Arab world. The article, entitled “Mona Eltahawy, Egyptian-American Activist, On the Power of Protest,”...

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

The Story of a South African Farm

As of March 1 this year, the new base salary for farm workers in South Africa will be R105 a day (about US$11 per day). That’s a 52% pay raise, which sounds impressive until you realize that...

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

Woman of the Year

It’s been a busy year for Cameroonian lawyer Alice Nkom, but then again it’s been a busy year for the Cameroonian government, and its various allies, persecuting and prosecuting anyone it suspects of being gay, lesbian, transgender,...

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Kenya’s #purplezebra Spring

Political springs, as in social movements that topple and/or transform political regimes, occur when the youth of a nation get on the move. And that may be what happened in Nairobi this past Monday. A harbinger of...

Saturday, May 19th, 2012

New public TV series from South Africa: “I am Woman”

Starting on April 1, South Africa’s public TV channel SABC3 has been running a weekly series called “I am Woman.”  Every week, the show tries to follow the arc of a woman’s journey, the ways in which...

Saturday, April 14th, 2012

First Lady Marieme Faye Sall: ‘The good Senegalese woman’

Senegal's new first lady, Marieme Faye Sall, represents a break with the country's political history after independence. Madame Sall’s husband, Macky Sall, has just been elected as President of Senegal. Her significance lies in the fact that...

Monday, January 16th, 2012

You remember Caster Semenya

There was a big birthday party a week or so ago, in South Africa. No, not that one, not the ANC centenary, although, amazingly, people are still debating that blowout a whole week later, including how some...

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

2011: The Year of the Woman

It was a great year, maybe one of the best ever, for direct action in-the-streets in-your-face pro-democracy movements, and they were largely pushed and pulled by women. Starting with Tunisia, food uprisings spread quickly to Egypt, Algeria,...

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

The health news that made the headlines

In November came the news that the Global Fund to fight Aids, TB and Malaria was in a financial crisis, because of declining donor commitments and failure by donors to honor existing commitments. The Fund’s board cancelled...

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011

The Assault on Patriarchy in Tunisia

By Dan Moshenberg Tunisians went to the polls on Sunday, October 23, 2011. Remember the date, because it’s historic. It’s the first free elections of the Arab Spring, which is, in large part, an African Spring. Tunisia....

Friday, September 16th, 2011

Nicholas Kristof Saves Another Woman

By Dan Moshenberg He’s ba-a-a-ack! After a decade or so of “saving” South East Asian sex workers from “slavery”, sometimes by actually purchasing them, Nicholas Kristof has found Africa. Kenya, to be specific, and there too, sex...

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

The Real Maids of Beirut

By Dan Moshenberg If you’ve followed the news from the Lebanon over the last few years, you’ve read quite a bit about the difficult to desperate situation of domestic workers. Maids, child care providers, housekeepers face unrelenting...

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

Malawi Spring

By Dan Moshenberg Did you hear about Malawi Spring? It started Wednesday, July 20. Thousands of people filled the streets of the capital Lilongwe, the commercial capital Blantyre, the northern city of Mzuzu, and elsewhere. Police are...

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

The Rwandan Glass Ceiling

The second instalment of Dan Moshenberg’s weekly posts (his first here) on that place where gender, Africa and media collide.–Sean Jacobs By Dan Moshenberg Let’s talk about Rwandan women. Last Friday, June 24, Pauline Nyiramasuhuko and her...

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

This Generation of African Women Leaders

Dan Moshenberg has written guest posts for AIAC before and we’ve HT’d him a few times. But this posts marks the first of his weekly posts here on gender politics.  He’ll keep the focus on Africa. Like...

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

Tartan Army

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

Political Economy

I just came across this great 2005 interview by “The Minnesota Review” with American political scientist Adolph Reed. In-between talking about his personal biography (he’s been a Marxist since he was thirteen) and his analyses of contemporary...

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010

New Sara Baartman Film

I just finished an essay (with my research assistant Adam Esrig) on new developments in African film–most notably the business model of Nollywood, the emergence of South Africa as a cheap back lot for B-grade Hollywood films...

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

The World of Tyler Perry

Whatever The New Yorker’s rationale for commissioning a piece on Tyler Perry, the “critic-proof” producer and director of black popular theater and television (he is a darling of the mainstream), but it is good take on the...

Monday, March 22nd, 2010

Homophobia as National Sport

This may make for depressing reading with your breakfast, but there’s nothing new about the entrenched  homophobia in South Africa, a place where men rape lesbians to “correct” them, a government minister last month refused to open...

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

Republic of Women

70% of Rwanda’s population are women. Via A24media.com

Sunday, October 25th, 2009

AL JAZEERA / RAPE AS WEAPON IN DR CONGO

Source.

Monday, October 5th, 2009

MISS NATURAL BEAUTY

Images from Miss Authentica, a beauty competition in Cote d’Ivoire that promotes “natural” beauty. Only women with “untreated skin” can enter. Skin bleachers which contain cancer are used by 75% of women in Cote d’Ivoire.

Sunday, September 20th, 2009

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR VIRGINS ONLY

“… Literacy rates in Sierra Leone are devastatingly low, just 29 per cent among women. One of the chief culprits, as the report indicates, is teenage pregnancy. About 12 per cent of girls have their first child...

Sunday, September 20th, 2009

CASTER SEMENYA AND THE IDEA OF “NORMAL” BOYS AND GIRLS

With the media spectacle around world beating athlete Caster Semenya gaining fever pitch, South African newspaper “The Cape Times” sacrificed one of its reporters working tirelessly on inequality in South Africa, to find out how common “intersexuality”...

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

GIVING BIRTH IN THE CONGO WAR ZONE

“Across sub-Saharan Africa, women have a one in 13 lifetime chance of dying in pregnancy and childbirth. In DR Congo’s North Kivu, where the basic kits and tools can be in egregiously short supply, the odds are...

Monday, September 7th, 2009

Weekend Links

So as usual, a bunch of links–new as well as ones–that have piled up in my bookmarks folder. First, some good news: a Sudanese court only fined–but did not flog–Lubna Hussein, the woman who wore jeans in...

Friday, August 28th, 2009

“IF CASTER [SEMENYA] IS A BOY, I’M A BOY”

My friend Herman Wasserman and I wrote an op-ed for The Observers, the website of the French TV station, France24, on the manufactured controversy around Caster Semenya, the new 800 m woman’s track and field world champion:

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