2631
3 mins read

Obiang Who?

Amidst the worst economic and social crisis Spain can remember, there is an iconic institution living its most glorious days. The Spanish national football team, commonly remembered in the past for sour losses and unforgettable mistakes, has taken world football by storm after winning a World Cup and two European Championships in the last five years. This indisputable success of a golden generation of players has raised the team to such heights of praise and public importance that any criticism is rare.

4042
5 mins read

Football and Dictatorships

World and European champions Spain will play Equatorial Guinea in a friendly in Malabo on November 16th. We can only speculate as to why Spain is playing this match. There’s…..

2098
9 mins read

10 Contested Images of 2012

Remember that little video campaign called #Kony2012? Yeah, we wish we could forget too. Few videos have reached the magnitude of pestilence that the non-profit Invisible Children’s video achieved this…..

899
2 mins read

The Lagos preacher and the football final

When it comes to football punditry, hindsight is the easy way out. So while your very own and brave AIAC published a  top 10 list of African footballers who could emerge…..

3 mins read

Of Football Underdogs and Politricks

The knockout phase of the Cup of Nations started this weekend and by next Sunday we’ll have a new champion. Events in Port Said, along with the Zimbabwean match-fixing scandal have made it a dreadful week for African football–but there has not been any question of postponing the remaining fixtures. The quarter-final line-up is without the tournament’s biggest losers, Senegal. Morocco and Angola also miss out. Earlier today red-hot Zambia played Sudan (in the end, Sudan came up short) and hosts Equatorial Guinea take on favorites Côte d’Ivoire as I am writing. The two major surprise quarterfinalists are Equatorial Guinea and Sudan, but they have very different back-stories.

1 min read

The Economist's Africa

In May 2000 The Economist ran a cover story: “Africa. The Hopeless Continent.” People talked about it for a while afterward. It spawned countless op-eds about Afro-pessimism and -optimism. It even became the basis for “Contemporary African Politics” college courses for a while. Now last week, they ran a feature cover where the magazine predict a more hopeful scenario for the continent’s 54 states.

1 min read

Demba Ba

Demba Ba has a habit of falling to his knees post-goal and praying.