2086
2 mins read

What we learned from day four of Afcon 2013

In the first match at the Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenburg. Côte d’Ivoire 2 v 1 Togo. Don’t believe the hype about Gervinho’s late winner. It was the much maligned Boubacar…..

2087
3 mins read

The Fairtrade Façade

“Trade not aid” – if you’ve been paying attention to the discourse on how to improve living standards for the world’s poor, it’s a familiar phrase. Over the past decade…..

1 min read

War and peace in Côte d’Ivoire

By the end of 2004, Côte d’Ivoire’s civil war had cooled to a simmer, but the country remained split, with a rebel-held north and a government-held south. What do these…..

3137
7 mins read

Drogbacite

There are some matches that end up seeming primarily the vehicle for one person to somehow attain mythical status. The Champions League final between Chelsea and Bayern was written, it seems now, purely to allow Didier Drogba a form of poetic catharsis worthy of fiction or film.

3 mins read

Tiken Jah Fakoly’s identity politics

A few days ago, Al Jazeera English channel screened (and then put online) a 30 minute documentary, “The Power of Song,” on the Ivorian reggae star Tiken Jah Fakoly. Made by a Canadian production company, the film was billed by Al Jazeera as following Fakoly on a visit to two village schools in Côte d’Ivoire that he funds (51% of Ivorians are illiterate). The publicity also emphasized generalities. Tiken Jah “fights for Africa’s poor and marginalized.”