2182
5 mins read

My Favorite Photographs: Arnaud Contreras

The Sahara is changing fast. Still a beautiful desert but not just that. Most populated cities such as Tamanrasset or Timbuktu are microcosms that reveal all the problems of those former touristic regions: threats of terrorism, trafficking, illegal migration and pressures on cultural and natural heritages. The only ways to escape this harsh reality for Saharan and Tuareg youth are cybercafés, mobile phone culture, festivals and soirées guitare (“guitar evenings”) celebrating their guitar heroes, the “Ishumar”, such as Tinariwen, Terakaft, Tamikrest, Bombino and many other bands. In their songs they celebrate the link between desert nature, old poetry, and of course women, whose role is essential in their society. Some texts may seem like calls for rebellion, but mainly those are calls for a self-consciousness as a people, of their identities.

2723
4 mins read

The Story of Cameroon’s First Metal Band

It’s been over a month since I watched Dutch artist Steven Jouwersma’s short film “N’gosa Bedimo” (Music from the Ghosts), and still I’m not quite sure what to say. You see, on one…..

4672
5 mins read

Everyone has their own Paul Biya

When someone says “Jean-Pierre Bekolo,” I think of the opening scene of his 2005 smash hit Les Saignantes—Adèle Ado suspended and twirling in a harness above leopard print sheets. The…..

778
2 mins read

New African films to watch, N°17

Yes, we’ve been slacking a bit with the weekly round-ups of new films (whether completed, almost ready or still in their early production stages) this year. Let’s correct that. First…..

1098
6 mins read

My Favorite Photographs N°11: Jide Odukoya

Nigerian photographer Jide Odukoya’s portfolio offers an exceptional insight into the social fabric of Lagos. His Facebook page documents fashion events, open mic ‘happenings’ and weddings, while his official website…..