Blackwater’s “Rwanda”


I know we’ve been hearing about evil Erik Prince and his name-swapping mercenaries for years (Blackwater, Xe, my personal favorite Academi, and the latest, Greystone). But I only recently discovered how close all of this is to my hometown. Hell, from their “idyllic Dutch hamlet” in Holland (Michigan) the Prince family has formed and backed some of the biggest and most powerful militant Christian groups in the world. Just check out this interactive map.

Readers of this blog will remember my interest in the sexualized “guilt-based aggression” at the heart of various African-saving campaigns launched this year. Now that I’ve also started paying attention to Prince’s attempts to clean up Blackwater’s image, I am fascinated by how often the “Rwanda” is pushed forward in order to win approval for military missions.

It’s here on CNN, the Boston Globe, Men’s Journal, and debated here in a West Michigan newspaper.

And this gentleman (in the video), who makes up history, worries about South Africa “becoming another Rwanda.” He calls on Blackwater to start up some kibbutzim in the Outlands. It makes sense since Blackwater has already hired men from South Africa’s notorious Apartheid-era Special Forces. His video message is long, and he spits or drips a good deal of fluid, so I’ll get to the point:

“Rwandan Genocide” is the polite way to say “Black Africa.”

Luckily, our Youtube organizer appeals for calm. To avoid another Rwanda, he is going to go through women:

In terms of journalistic and intelligence, gathering women are extremely important, cuz women can breach through the racial divide: because they’re less considered a threat, by such terrorist organizations as the ANC youth league I would say. Particularly important I would say would be…African women who are educated, and understand that the Western way of life is actually…is going to provide more material wealth to their children and better survival for their children.

There is plenty of guilting in this Blackwater fantasy. Think about those poor Rwandan women who could not save their children. But he’s got a lot to learn from Prince. Now he was at his finest on ‘Hotel Rwanda’ in this 2007 interview:

CHARLIE ROSE: So it’s a support mission. It wasn’t, as someone also said about you, because of how much you love the Navy Seals, that you have dreamed of creating a private army that could be a lightning quick response and deal with circumstances like Rwanda, like Darfur, and perhaps other hot spots, essentially saying “let me take care of it, I can do this. I have the men, I have the skill, I have the training, I have the know-how. Let me take over some of the responsibilities of peacekeeping in the world.”

ERIK PRINCE: No. That’s too far of an assumption. But who can watch the movie “Hotel Rwanda” and not wish it had a different outcome?

CHARLIE ROSE: No one.

ERIK PRINCE: Who didn’t wish that the U.N. would have sent troops or yanked those Belgian commandos back there, to secure that hotel and to provide some safe havens? I mean, you let almost a million people in a country about the size of Maryland get killed by farm tools over four months.

Comments

comments

Megan Eardley

Megan Eardley is a writer and researcher who studies missionary societies and the private security industry.

2 Comments
  1. well, well, Megan. Your compatriot from idyllic Dutch transplant village in michigan may have had too little genetic variation up there, and perhaps little in the way of roughage (looks a little constipated, no?). In any case, I will find out if there is any ‘Rwandan Genocide’ on the way when I’m in Cape Town this june, and report back to Mr. Prince. Cape Town tris hard to eliminate the “Rwandan Genocide’ but…it keeps on encroaching on the Dutch village…

  2. This sort of thing is so frustrating because it cuts both ways. The way I see it our governments should be doing more to ensure everyone “buys in” to the idea of a nation state. This would need to include participation in all aspects of life social, cultural, economic etc. Unfortunately the combination of many factors including the lack of mature political environments, global economics and the reality of having to redress issues resulting from colonialism mean we have quite a way to go down this road yet. Videos like that gentleman’s highlight the other side of the problem.

    What is the point of prescribing solutions to the symptoms without fixing the roots of the issues? As long as there is economic, social and cultural disparity in South Africa the threat of “Rwandan Genocide” will always exist if not in reality then definitely in the minds of those intent on maintaining their privilege and those intent who aspire to attain a similar level of privilege. Membership of these groups will not be based on race, which I am sure will confound many of these talking heads. The rise of the gated community and private security armies across Africa leads me to believe that at least one side has decided how they are going address the issues.

Mailing List

Sign up for email updates!

 

Not the continent with 54 countries







©Africa is a Country, 2016